Fählensee, Alpstein, Switzerland | Moon & Honey Travel

Switzerland

Switzerland

Switzerland is a land of alpine pastures, high mountains, and serene lakes. We fell in love with Switzerland from the moment we crossed the German border. And while, we’ve collectively only spent time in Appenzellerland, we can’t wait to explore more of this alpine country in the future.

 

Getting Around

If you’re driving in Switzerland and intend on taking the highways (Autobahnen), make sure to buy a “Swiss motorway sticker” or “vignette” for 40 CHF (approx. 41 USD). It is valid for the whole year. Unlike Austria, there are no 10 day or shorter period options. In Switzerland, the “vignette” can be purchased in petrol stations, post offices, garages, TCS outlets, as well as from the road traffic authorities. More info: here.

 

This Guide Includes:

  • Switzerland Basics
  • Where to Go (Interactive Map)
  • What to Experience in Switzerland
  • What to Eat & Drink in Switzerland
Seealpsee Trail, Alpstein, Switzerland | Moon & Honey Travel
The Basics

Official Name: Swiss Confederation. Confoederatio Helvetica is also a name for Switzerland, hence the abbreviation CH.

Capital: Bern

Government: Federal Republic 

Regions: Switzerland is divided into 26 Cantons

Population: 8.4 Million 

Language: German, French, Italian and Romansh

Currency: Swiss Franc

Tipping Etiquette: Tipping isn’t obligatory. There’s a service charge automatically included in all published prices. 

Water Quality: Excellent 

Something Interesting:  Dog owners must pay an annual tax for owning a dog. 

Where to Go in Switzerland

Click the dots to explore specific destinations
Switzerland  Placeholder
Switzerland
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Mit däm/däre cha me go Ross stäle.

 

 

 

 

 

Swiss Saying

You can steal horses with him / her.

(You can depend on someone in all situations)

What to Experience in Switzerland

Our favorite things to see and do
Saxer Lücke, Alpstein | Moon & Honey Travel
Saxer Lücke, Alpstein

Hiking the Alpstein in the Swiss Alps 

Alpstein is a mountain range in the Appenzell region of Switzerland. The hiking here is accessible and incredibly rewarding. Trails meander through alpine dairy farms and around lakes. Bell-wearing cattle and goats roam around the alp freely. That particular bell chorus sound is what makes hiking here so special.

A few hikes to consider are:

  • Seealpsee (lake)
  • Äscher (mountain inn)
  • Saxer Lücke (mountain pass)
  • Fählensee (lake) & Bolenwees (mountain inn)

For more details on these hikes, read our Appenzellerland Travel Guide.

What to Eat & Drink in Switzerland

Appenzeller Cheese – regional cheese with a distinct bold and spicy taste.

 

Rösti – hash browns. You can order Rösti with eggs, Appenzeller cheese (recommended), and bacon.

Switzerland Resources

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External Resources:

@moonhoneytravelers
  • We’ve spent the last few days in Pokhara and have done absolutely nothing, apart from slowly hop around from smoothie joint to restaurant to coffee shop. Pokhara is a city located on Phewa Lake and a favored destination among trekkers pre- and post-trek. After a long multi-day trek, Pokhara satisfies all your cravings and indulges you with its stress-free atmosphere, clean air, cafés, and spas. We’ve really loved our time here. However, we do acknowledge, that Pokhara is probably not best destination for travelers (if you didn’t do a long trek). It caters unabashedly to tourists, with happy hour offers, hippie clothing, German bakeries, Pizzerias, and tattoo shops. So while we’ve been enjoying the comforts of this inauthentic tourist hub, we can’t help but ask “is this a good thing?”
  • We received a question about AMS and insurance as it pertains to the Annapurna Circuit. AMS (Acute Mountain Sickness) is caused by reduced air pressure and lower oxygen levels at higher altitudes. Your body can adjust and adapt to higher altitude, but it needs time. Doctors recommend that you sleep three nights around 3,500 meters before ascending further. They also recommend that above 3,500 meters, you only sleep 500 meters above where you slept the previous night. If you don’t feel well (nausea, dizziness, headaches, etc...), you’re supposed to descend to the last place you felt well. Slide right to see AMS Symptoms.  Apart from slow ascension, it’s important to avoid alcohol. In Manang, during the trekking seasons, there’s a medical facility staffed with western doctors. They conduct a free daily talk about acclimatization and how to recognize and respond to various symptoms of AMS. Definitely attend this session. In terms of our personal experience, most people we met experienced some degree of AMS - some at 2,500 meters, while others only at the pass. It’s common to take diamox (Acetazolamide) to help your body adjust to the altitude gain. Unlike ibuprofen, it doesn’t mask the symptoms of AMS, it actually prevents and reduces the symptoms. Consult your doctor about diamox usage, before you go on your trek. Re: insurance, you absolutely need it!!!!
  • Let’s talk about food on the Annapurna Circuit. The main staple food is Dal Baht, a traditional meal consisting of steamed rice, lentil soup (dal), curried vegetables, and pickles. We ate dal baht daily, sometimes twice. With free refills, it’s the best thing to eat when you’re hungry. Most menus also offer curries, momos (dumplings), fried noodles and rice, thukpa (Tibetan noodle soup) as well as pizza, pasta and various soups. There are also bakeries that serve excellent cakes, crumbles and pastries. We’re going to wrap up our Annapurna Circuit posts, so let us know if you have any questions about the trek. #dalbahtpower #dalbahtpower24hour #hikeforfood
  • Annapurna Circuit Days 22 & 23: Tatopani - Ghorepani - Hile - Nayapul. Our final days of the trek were marked by stairs, leeches, mule caravans, water buffalo and good food. Though mountain views were seldom, we saw beautiful terraced fields and hiked through verdant rainforest. The final stretch was a never-ending staircase descent that was physically and mentally taxing. When the trail intersected with the dusty road just after Hile, we opted for a Jeep to Nayapul. At Nayapul, we grabbed a local bus to Pokhara. Shortly after getting on the bus, it stopped. Our fellow bus riders explained that we’d be here for 1.5 hours, because of road construction. We chatted with a few locals, who shared their views on their government, its rampant corruption, and their personal struggles. We arrived in Pokhara at 8 pm, after an enlightening and bumpy journey.
  • Annapurna Circuit Day 21: Kalopani to Tatopani. We started hiking at 6:15 am, because we were determined to end our day in the natural hot springs of Tatopani. When we reached the town in the late afternoon, people were still recovering from a landslide. Unfortunately, a few homes and lodgings were demolished. Some trekkers even lost their belongings in the landslide. When we soaked in the warm springs, a friendly Nepali family (who were touring the region) asked us where we were from, if we could swim and whether we liked Nepal. Their 12 year old daughter was really excited to speak English and shared her career (science) and travel aspirations (visit a developed country).
  • Annapurna Circuit Days 19 & 20: Kagbeni - Marpha - Kalopani. Most of the trail followed the riverbed Of Kali Gandaki. The wind picked up with a vengeance and funneled down the valley, making this part of the trek dusty and miserable. We understood why most people opted for a jeep or bus to their next destination. After lunch in Jomsom, we walked another 1.5 hours to the beautiful town Marpha, where we spent the night. Each stone building is painted white and all the wooden door and window frames are painted burgundy. The streets are immaculate - barely any mule, horse and ox poo. After a night in Marpha, we headed to Kalopani. We followed the forest trail on the east side of the river almost all the way. Only a few parts of the path were washed out. Luckily, the trail was sheltered mostly from the wind. Photos of Marpha.
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