Fählensee, Alpstein, Switzerland | Moon & Honey Travel

Switzerland

Switzerland

Switzerland is a land of alpine pastures, high mountains, and serene lakes. We fell in love with Switzerland from the moment we crossed the German border. And while, we’ve collectively only spent time in Appenzellerland, we can’t wait to explore more of this alpine country in the future.

 

Getting Around

If you’re driving in Switzerland and intend on taking the highways (Autobahnen), make sure to buy a “Swiss motorway sticker” or “vignette” for 40 CHF (approx. 41 USD). It is valid for the whole year. Unlike Austria, there are no 10 day or shorter period options. In Switzerland, the “vignette” can be purchased in petrol stations, post offices, garages, TCS outlets, as well as from the road traffic authorities. More info: here.

 

This Guide Includes:

  • Switzerland Basics
  • Where to Go (Interactive Map)
  • What to Experience in Switzerland
  • What to Eat & Drink in Switzerland
Seealpsee Trail, Alpstein, Switzerland | Moon & Honey Travel
The Basics

Official Name: Swiss Confederation. Confoederatio Helvetica is also a name for Switzerland, hence the abbreviation CH.

Capital: Bern

Government: Federal Republic 

Regions: Switzerland is divided into 26 Cantons

Population: 8.4 Million 

Language: German, French, Italian and Romansh

Currency: Swiss Franc

Tipping Etiquette: Tipping isn’t obligatory. There’s a service charge automatically included in all published prices. 

Water Quality: Excellent 

Something Interesting:  Dog owners must pay an annual tax for owning a dog. 

Where to Go in Switzerland

Click the dots to explore specific destinations
Switzerland  Placeholder
Switzerland
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Mit däm/däre cha me go Ross stäle.

 

 

 

 

 

Swiss Saying

You can steal horses with him / her.

(You can depend on someone in all situations)

What to Experience in Switzerland

Our favorite things to see and do
Saxer Lücke, Alpstein | Moon & Honey Travel
Saxer Lücke, Alpstein

Hiking the Alpstein in the Swiss Alps

Alpstein is a mountain range in the Appenzell region of Switzerland. The hiking here is accessible and incredibly rewarding. Trails meander through alpine dairy farms and around lakes. Bell-wearing cattle and goats roam around the alp freely. That particular bell chorus sound is what makes hiking here so special.

A few hikes to consider are:

  • Seealpsee (lake)
  • Äscher (mountain inn)
  • Saxer Lücke (mountain pass)
  • Fählensee (lake) & Bolenwees (mountain inn)

For more details on these hikes, read our Appenzellerland Travel Guide.

What to Eat & Drink in Switzerland

Appenzeller Cheese – regional cheese with a distinct bold and spicy taste.

 

Rösti – hash browns. You can order Rösti with eggs, Appenzeller cheese (recommended), and bacon.

Switzerland Resources

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@moonhoneytravelers
  • Alta Via 1.  We just finished hiking the Alta Via 1 - a multi-day trek in the Italian Dolomites. And, it was an adventure we’ll never forget.  The first two days of the trek, we hiked in pouring rain. With no mountain views and poor weather conditions, we tried our best to keep our spirits up.  On Day 3, we set off once again in rain. After a few hours on the trail, it started to snow. The smart thing would have been to turn back and secure a taxi to the next rifugio. But, we kept going. As we progressed, it became increasingly more difficult to find the trail. The snow was covering up the trail markers and the wind swept away the footprints of other hikers. We lost the trail several times.  The snow that was floating down ever so gently as first turned into a no-bullshit blizzard. We were soaking wet, increasingly numb, and at a complete loss of where to go. I started crying. With no one in site and no idea where the hut was, we started to freak out.  At this point, we were physically shaking. We took a few me minutes to regroup in a WWI cave. Sheltered from the blowing snow, we could locate where we were on Maps.me.  We found the trail and willed our frozen bodies into motion. When we saw Lagazuoi hut, we felt a tidal wave of relief.  After ringing out everything from our shirts to our underwear and changing into warm clothes, we drank 2 liters of hot tea and then met the most amazing group of women! Thank you Chris, Sigi, Jo and Susie for the wonderful company, conversations, and shared meals.  @susielambie @jored7  Photo: 2 days after the storm.
  • 2 years ago Kati and I visited the Dolomites for the first time.  It was a whirlwind of a trip, as we were relocating from Cologne to Vienna. We drove through Germany’s Black Forest, Switzerland’s Appenzell region, across the Dolomites and finally into Austria.  During our time in the Dolomites, we experienced our very first hut to hut hike. Until that point, multi-day hiking was a vague, intimidating concept. After our short 3-day trek around Sexten, we were hooked. And, looking back, it’s easy to say that that trip really changed our lives.  We’re finally back in the Dolomites. This time we’re here to hike the Alta Via 1.
  • The pearl of the Rätikon.  Our recent hike around the Rätikon Alps started and ended here. During our trek, we saw almost every vantage point of this lake.  We just published our 5-day hiking itinerary (link in bio). We also included suggested 3 and 4-day routes, if you have less time.  https://moonhoneytravel.com/europe/austria/raetikon-high-trail/
  • Rätikon.  This beautiful limestone mountain range straddles the border between Austria, Switzerland, and Liechtenstein.  We just wrapped up a 5 day hike around the range, overnighting in Austrian and Swiss mountain huts along the way.  We’ll be sharing our itinerary on the blog very soon. Until then, happy hiking dear friends.
  • Berliner Höhenweg (Berlin High Trail)  We just finished trekking the Berlin High Trail in Tyrol, Austria.  This gorgeous alpine route showcases the finest mountain and glacier vistas of the Zillertal Alps. It’s an extraordinary adventure replete with challenging ascents and descents, rustic and grand mountain huts, and bell-wearing cows and sheep.  Our trekking experience was filled with indescribable beauty, hearty Austrian food, agonizing and dangerous descents in rain, physical pain (follow our stories for details), and a stolen iPad. 
Some days were extraordinary. Other days were quite good. And one day was utterly miserable. That’s life in a nutshell, right? Cheers to living the good days, the okay days and the bad ones too.
  • I want to share with you one of my favorite German words.  Genießer/Genießerin is a person who delights and takes pleasure in living. It’s someone who enjoys and relishes the present moment completely. It can be applied broadly, whether someone enjoys reading, drinking a cappuccino, hiking, or cycling. The connotation of this type of pleasure is wholly positive.  There is no direct translation in the English language. In English, too much pleasure is perceived as a negative. We use words like glutton, hedonist, libertine to describe people who take (too much) pleasure in certain things. In English, pleasure must be restrained. Without such restraint, pleasure isn’t “good,” but marred with sin.  Would you define yourself as a Genießer/Genießerin?

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