Hiking in Montenegro - Top Hiking Destinations in Montenegro

Hiking in Montenegro

Montenegro Hiking Destinations

Montenegro is a small Balkan country blessed with incredible natural beauty. The best way to uncover that beauty is by hiking in the Montenegro mountains. There is no shortage of hiking options, as most of Montenegro’s surface area is covered by the rugged Dinaric Alps, a mountain chain that extends from Slovenia to Albania. However, compared to well-known alpine destinations in Europe, Montenegro is still a bit of a mystery.

Because not all hiking areas in Montenegro are accessible by transit, it can be challenging to reach some of the country’s most stunning trails. The upside is that if you make the effort you’ll be blissfully alone in some of Europe’s most untouched landscapes. In this Montenegro hiking guide, we’re going to map out and detail where to hike in the land of black mountains.

If you’re in the process of planning a trip, also check out our Montenegro Itinerary and the Best Places to Visit in Montenegro.

 
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Montenegro Hiking Guide - Top Hiking Destinations in Montenegro

Hiking in Montenegro Guide Overview

  • Montenegro Hiking Map
  • Montenegro Hiking Destinations
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Where to Hike in Montenegro - Durmitor Mountains

Montenegro Hiking Map

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Best Hiking Destinations in Montenegro

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Hiking in Montenegro - top hiking destinations in Montenegro, Prokletije Mountains

Prokletije National Park

Prokletije, meaning “the accursed mountains,” is a mountain range that makes up the southernmost and highest part of the Dinaric Alps. Extending also into Albania and Kosovo, this wild and remote mountain region can be accessed from many different valleys and villages.

The multi-day Peaks of the Balkans trek traverses all three countries, giving long distance hikers an opportunity to explore this region deeply. However, there’s no need to trek for weeks in the Accursed Mountains to experience the most epic summits. A day hike to Volušnica, in Montenegro’s Prokletije National Park, will deliver the most awe-inspiring views of the vertical Karanfili peaks across Grebaje Valley.

To learn more about planning a trip here, read our Prokletije National Park hiking guide.

Stay in Grebaje Valley

Grebaje Valley (also spelled Grbaje) is a scenic and narrow valley at the foot of the Karanfili peaks in Prokletije National Park. This is the ultimate base for exploring the area. These are great options: Bungalows Katun Maja Karanfil and Bungalows Prokletije.

 
Hiking in Montenegro - Durmitor National Park

Durmitor National Park

Durmitor National Park is located in northeast Montenegro, situated between the canyons of the Tara and Piva rivers. Durmitor is often described as the most beautiful area in Montenegro. We agree. In 1980, the park was classified as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. There are numerous, easy-to-follow hiking trails across the park to various lakes and summits. Use our Durmitor National Park hiking guide to find out where to hike.

Stay in Žabljak

Žabljak is the gateway to Durmitor National Park. We recommend staying in the town center so that you are walking distance to various restaurants and the main park entrance. These are great options: Hostel Hikers Den (budget), Vuk Popovic (mid-range), and Hotel Soa (luxury).

 
Hiking in Montenegro, Kotor

Kotor

Cradled by mountains, the glistening Bay of Kotor is one of Montenegro’s best-known destinations. There are a few notable hikes around the Old Town of Kotor that provide stunning views of the Bay as well as the Old Town’s slopping fortifications. The steep and challenging Ladder of Kotor hike begins outside the old town and zigzags up the mountain along 70 plus switchbacks. Because this route is exposed, start early to avoid the midday sun.

A shorter day hike option is the hike to Sveti Ivan fortress (also called Fortress of St. John and the Castle of San Giovanni). The trail starts in the Old Town. There is an entrance fee of 8 EUR to tackle the 1,350 stairs leading up to the old fortress. The hike first passes Our Lady of Remedy, a church built in 1518. The view of the walled city is very satisfying, so some people even turn around at this point. However, if you push on to the Castle of San Giovanni, you’ll be happy you did.

Stay near Kotor

The Old Town gets very congested in high season. We recommend staying somewhere nearby along the Bay, but not directly inside the walled city. Here are some excellent options Apartments Nadja (Budget), Apartments Residence Portofino (Mid-Range), and Hotel Casa del Mare – Amfora (Luxury).

 
Komovi Mountains, Montenegro

Komovi Mountains

The Komovi mountain range is located in eastern Montenegro, close to the Albanian border. It’s a wonderfully remote area dotted with katuns (herdsmen settlements). The highest peaks of the range are Kom Kučki (2487m), Kom Vasojevićki (2461m) and Kom Lijevorečki (2483). The best base for exploring Komovi is Štavna, a high alpine plateau at the base of Kom Vasojevićki. We recommend hiking from Štavna to Kom Vasojevićki. This is a 4 – 4.5 hours return hike, with a total ascent gain of 710 meters.

Stay in Štavna

We highly recommend staying in Eko Katun Štavna (Ethno Village Štavna), which is located directly on the Štavna plateau. Bonus: Eko Katun Štavna also has a restaurant that makes delicious, homemade Montenegrin cuisine.

 
Where to hike in Montenegro - top hiking destinations, Durmitor National Park

Montenegro Travel Resources

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@moonhoneytravelers
  • Alta Via 1.  We just finished hiking the Alta Via 1 - a multi-day trek in the Italian Dolomites. And, it was an adventure we’ll never forget.  The first two days of the trek, we hiked in pouring rain. With no mountain views and poor weather conditions, we tried our best to keep our spirits up.  On Day 3, we set off once again in rain. After a few hours on the trail, it started to snow. The smart thing would have been to turn back and secure a taxi to the next rifugio. But, we kept going. As we progressed, it became increasingly more difficult to find the trail. The snow was covering up the trail markers and the wind swept away the footprints of other hikers. We lost the trail several times.  The snow that was floating down ever so gently as first turned into a no-bullshit blizzard. We were soaking wet, increasingly numb, and at a complete loss of where to go. I started crying. With no one in site and no idea where the hut was, we started to freak out.  At this point, we were physically shaking. We took a few me minutes to regroup in a WWI cave. Sheltered from the blowing snow, we could locate where we were on Maps.me.  We found the trail and willed our frozen bodies into motion. When we saw Lagazuoi hut, we felt a tidal wave of relief.  After ringing out everything from our shirts to our underwear and changing into warm clothes, we drank 2 liters of hot tea and then met the most amazing group of women! Thank you Chris, Sigi, Jo and Susie for the wonderful company, conversations, and shared meals.  @susielambie @jored7  Photo: 2 days after the storm.
  • 2 years ago Kati and I visited the Dolomites for the first time.  It was a whirlwind of a trip, as we were relocating from Cologne to Vienna. We drove through Germany’s Black Forest, Switzerland’s Appenzell region, across the Dolomites and finally into Austria.  During our time in the Dolomites, we experienced our very first hut to hut hike. Until that point, multi-day hiking was a vague, intimidating concept. After our short 3-day trek around Sexten, we were hooked. And, looking back, it’s easy to say that that trip really changed our lives.  We’re finally back in the Dolomites. This time we’re here to hike the Alta Via 1.
  • The pearl of the Rätikon.  Our recent hike around the Rätikon Alps started and ended here. During our trek, we saw almost every vantage point of this lake.  We just published our 5-day hiking itinerary (link in bio). We also included suggested 3 and 4-day routes, if you have less time.  https://moonhoneytravel.com/europe/austria/raetikon-high-trail/
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  • Berliner Höhenweg (Berlin High Trail)  We just finished trekking the Berlin High Trail in Tyrol, Austria.  This gorgeous alpine route showcases the finest mountain and glacier vistas of the Zillertal Alps. It’s an extraordinary adventure replete with challenging ascents and descents, rustic and grand mountain huts, and bell-wearing cows and sheep.  Our trekking experience was filled with indescribable beauty, hearty Austrian food, agonizing and dangerous descents in rain, physical pain (follow our stories for details), and a stolen iPad. 
Some days were extraordinary. Other days were quite good. And one day was utterly miserable. That’s life in a nutshell, right? Cheers to living the good days, the okay days and the bad ones too.
  • I want to share with you one of my favorite German words.  Genießer/Genießerin is a person who delights and takes pleasure in living. It’s someone who enjoys and relishes the present moment completely. It can be applied broadly, whether someone enjoys reading, drinking a cappuccino, hiking, or cycling. The connotation of this type of pleasure is wholly positive.  There is no direct translation in the English language. In English, too much pleasure is perceived as a negative. We use words like glutton, hedonist, libertine to describe people who take (too much) pleasure in certain things. In English, pleasure must be restrained. Without such restraint, pleasure isn’t “good,” but marred with sin.  Would you define yourself as a Genießer/Genießerin?

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